April 22, 2019

Rolf Benz showroom & factory visit in Nagold


With a trip to Milan and a kitchen renovation that is still going on, I almost forgot to show you some images of my trip to the Rolf Benz factory and showroom earlier this year. I always enjoy getting to know a brand better than just at the fair, in January I visited the huge stand where Rolf Benz presented their new collection, when taking over the imm instagram account. You can still see a selection of my posts here at the #immspired highlighted album

A beautiful stand and the located opposite Rolf Benz cafe was a welcome spot for meetups and a break during the long days at the fair. 
The showroom is located in Nagold, a small town in southwestern Germany, bordering the Northern Black Forest. During lunch I had the opportunity to get a glimpse of the beautiful city centre with it’s half-timbered houses and modern architecture. 


Rolf Benz stand at imm Cologne



Rolf Benz has been producing sofas for more than 50 years, since young upholsterer, Rolf Benz from Nagold founded “Rolf Benz” in 1964. With the addiform elements he made a radical break from the traditional, conventional arrangement of sofa, two opposite facing armchairs and a coffee table. The elements of the addiform are flexible and combinable in their arrangement something quite revolutionair that time. The first editions and famous sofa’s, used in tv shows, are real style icons and showcased at the entrance of the showroom, pictured above.


Our visit started with a small tour through one of the workshops, where young students are educated and taught every single detail of the machines used in the factory, and the process from a piece of fabric to complete upholstery. We had fun following a small class with the solid machines used.

Next a tour through the factory where each year several hundreds of thousands of square metres of fabric and leather are turned into covers by specialist employees who have a huge know how about the fabric and leather they work with, helped with technologies that have been specially developed for Rolf Benz.

The employee scans, checks and touches each meter of fabric by sight and by hand. It was good to see nothing is waste as the scanner and the employee’s trained eye divide the leather up into different zones that are used according to their suitability for conspicuous surfaces such as seat cushions and rests, or for less visible parts underneath the sofa.

A visit to a factory lead you through the whole process from selecting material, to the department where carpenters prepare and assemble the frames manually and the upholstery of every single piece of the sofa or chair. Apart from supplied parts such as injection moulding, foam and metal feet, Rolf Benz create everything themselves, often by hand and no piece of furniture leaves the factory before a final inspection



At the 3,800 square metres showroom the complete collection is on display, visitors can test and try out the functions of every single piece and select their favourite covering from the extensive collection of fabrics and leathers.

Rolf Benz produces everything for the home, next to the collection of sofa's there are several coffee tablescarpets and accessories for the sitting area and complete dining solutions, remember the video's I made at imm about the marble table with wooden inlay? It can still be found at my own imm stories, including a demonstration of their Aura sofa! 


I made a few snapshots at the showroom, can you believe me if I tell you we tested every single sofa which resulted in messy pictures of us not wanting to get out of the sofa's and happy faces. For more pictures of the showroom and products I would recommend to visit the Rolf Benz website and have a look and read into their rich history and huge collection. 








This post is written in collaboration with Rolf Benz who kindly covered my travel costs

pictures vosgesparis | 2nd picture by Rolf Benz
April 20, 2019

Les Arcanistes by Studio Pepe | Milan design week 2019



Studiopepe’s Manifesto Project for Milan Design Week 2019 took place in a beautiful former gold manufacture dating back to the 1900s. After last years small exhibition, have a look here at my impression of Club Unseen this year's exhibition was overwhelming. It was large, lots to see and discover and I must admit I skipped a few rooms.

'Les Arcanists' as the project was called were ante-litteram chemists, who held the arcane and secret knowledge of formulas able to create porcelain and to work with materials such as glass and metals. 


Studiopepe, in collaboration with their partners, designed a path through design and bespoke pieces, re-editions of historical pieces, art pieces and installation rooms in which the connection between matter, archetypes and the power of symbols is deepened. The experience of Les Arcanistes translates into a sequence of spaces: the Source of the Vibrational Water, the Materioteca, the Alchemic Laboratory and the Mantica Society. Next week more of Milan Design week! 






pictures ©vosgesparis
April 17, 2019

Openhouse event at the private home of Christian and Antonio


Just before Milan design week starts, my inbox gets overloaded with invites from different brands to come and see their new collections, special events and installations. My favourite invites though, are the events in the private homes which always gives you a perfect chance to meet people you otherwise would not have met and get a peek into their life and homes. 

'Openhouse' is a magazine printed in San Sebastian, Spain filled with beautiful photography, interesting interviews of people who open special places around the world that the reader can visit and join in with the activities. Openhouse is also a guide to their secret loved places in their towns, and some favourite recipes. 

During Milan design week, issue 11 was launched with a special event at the home of Christian Pizzinini and Antonio Scolari, their house in Puglia is featured in the new issue and for the occasion they opened up their home in Milan together with Openhouse, which was an unique occasion to meet them and see their collection of design pieces from the 20th century.








A New Take On Tradition
In issue 11, A New Take On Tradition, the Openhouse team aim to recover the past while moving forward. They spend a day with Arno Declercq and Miquel Alzueta, discuss art with Eduardo Monti, and submerge themselves in the gallery-home Palazzo dell’Elefante. They visit Casa Poli in Chile and the Sheats Goldstein Residence in Los Angeles, before travelling to India to discover the home of Pierre Jeanneret in Chandigarh. 


pictures @vosgesparis
April 15, 2019

ANTHOLOGY | Vincenzo De Cotiis | Milan design week 2019


Milan design week 2019 is over... can we do it all over again!? I had a fantastic week filled with inspiration, good food, a bit of sun and a lovely w/ Style collaboration. While being in Milan I always take some time off from the many special Milan design week projects and visit my favourite Milanese designers and showrooms.

Closed during last year's Salone, and back with a curated exhibition at his gallery this year was 
Vincenzo de Cotiis, someone who I regularly feature on my blog with his beautiful renovations and projects. 

This year Vincezo and Claudia Rose De Cotiis presented the first 'Carpenters Workshop Gallery' A curated exhibition with work by fifteen artists next to Vincenzo's own work.

De Cotiis: "The archetypal gesture of material manipulation is the guiding thread throughout this exhibition. From a brutal approach to organic contortions, passing from primitive expressions, reaching the purest conceptuality: a sculptural archive made up of elements that represent our eclectic times, establishing a dialogue among differences and consonances"















pictures ©vosgesparis
April 3, 2019

Ark Journal launch | Sørensen Leather X Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen


Looking forward to the launch of the 'Ark Journal' , a new Scandinavian magazine of interiors, design, architecture and art. In Volume One Sørensen Leather and Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen, co founder of Norm Architects will explore fundamental themes and the enduring appeal of modernism.  

Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen: 'Anthropomorphism' originates from the Greek word ánthrōpos (ἄνθρωπος,lit. “human”) and morphē (μορφή, “form”). It attributes human characteristics to non-human entities, and in doing so helps us to understand the world around us by relating it to our own shape, size and emotions.In architecture and design, anthropomorphism (or bio-morphism) is used to create spaces or objects that are inspired by or stimulate human symmetry, scale, or structures of living nature.


pictures courtesy Norm Architects